You may have heard about how celebrities such as Kim Kardashian and Bar Refaeli have improved their skin using their own blood via a process called the Vampire Lift. Although appearing somewhat bizarre, the procedure does work to stimulate rejuvenating factors in your skin to help keep it young looking.

The procedure has become so popular and effective on the skin it is now also being using in the scalp to stimulate new and existing hair growth. Your natural platelets in your blo0d (the PRP or platelet rich plasma fraction) contain compounds that, when released, stimulate the growth of your tissues, including your tiny vessels, fibroblasts, skin cells and hair follicles.

The treatments take around two hours and can be performed while you’re awake with a local anesthetic and mild sedation. Some of your blood is obtained from your arm and then separated through a special process that concentrates the platelets (PRP). After the local anesthetic is given, the PRP is injected all over the scalp, but especially in areas of hair loss. After the procedure, you can go back to normal activities.

Over the next few weeks, the tiny injections stimulate the growth of new vessels into the hair follicles, stimulate growth of the follicles, and result in fuller existing hair and regrowth of hair from dormant hair follicles. Optimum results can be seen at three months, and further treatments may be needed to maintain these results and yield even better the results over time.

Your should always keep in mind that PRP is not considered an alternative to hair transplant procedures that fill bald areas of the scalp. However, combining PRP with these procedures has been shown to result in improved results, supporting the efficacy of the use of PRP in stimulating growth of hair follicles. [1],[2],[3], [4] It has been proven to improve healing and stimulate growth of essential components of tissues.[5]

 

References

[1] Chaudhari, ND, et al. “Role of Platelet-rich Plasma in the Management of Androgenetic Alopecia”. Intern Joun of Trichology, 2012, Oct-Dec., 4(4): 291-292. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3681120/

[2] Lopes, V, et al “Autologous platelet-rich plasma as a potential therapeutic tool in androgenetic alopecia”. Journ Amer. Acad. Derm., April 2013, 68 (4s):AB103.

[3] Greco, J., and R. Brandt. “Preliminary experience and extended applications for the use of autologous platelet rich plasma in hair transplantation surgery” .Hair Transplant Forum Int’l. 2007; 17:131-132

[4] Greco, J., and R. Brandt. “The effects of autologous platelet rich plasma and various growth factors on non-transplanted miniaturized hair.” Hair Transplant Forum Int’l. 2009; 19:49-50

[5] Albanese, A, et al. “Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) in dental and oral surgery: from the wound healing to bone regeneration”. Immun Ageing 2013, 10:23. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3683340/